David Adjaye: A House for an Art Collector


About This Book
An in-depth presentation of an important contribution to New York residential architecture. Considered one of the most important architects of his generation, David Adjaye is lauded for high-profile buildings such as the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, and the recent competition-winning design for the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Designed and built over five years for the contemporary art collector Adam Lindemann, 77E77 was conceived as a sophisticated response to the specific site and the culturally rich neighborhood. The result is a spatially complex series of interlocking spaces, providing suitable rooms for both the challenging art collection it houses and a young and growing family. With 77E77 Adjaye has made a fresh and successful contribution to the history of the modern home in New York: a house for our new generation.

Reviews
“A new book David Adjaye: A House for an Art Collector, published by Rizzoli, documents every room wall and basement nook of the Lindemann Dayan house revealing both garish taste and a formal inventiveness that hasn’t been seen in a private New York residence since the days of Paul Rudolph.” ~New York Magazine

“David Adjaye is the Michael Maltzan of British architecture, fusing the cerebral and the tactile, collaborating with artists and collectors, and creating buildings at both ends of the price spectrum. The National Museum of African Art in Washington DC will make him a household name when it’s completed, four years from now.” ~Form

“It is rare to have an entire book devoted to one single-family residence. However, this is a special case, a New York carriage house built in 1898 and expanded over a period of five years… the house is eccentric as hell.” ~Interior Design

“The 128-page House for an Art Collector opens with construction shots, elevation diagrams and blueprint-like plans: not your ordinary coffee table book. it gradually guides readers through the process of transforming the classic Upper East Side carriage house into an innovative home replete with ideal spaces to showcase a rotating art collection alongside room for an expanding family.” ~New York Observer